Frequently Asked Questions

What problem is the 183 North Mobility Project addressing?

Constructed in 1996 as a four-to-six lane divided highway, the section of US 183 North between SH 45 North and MoPac attracts up to 190,000 cars and trucks per day. Populations in communities along this corridor grew between 70% in the City of Austin to 848% in the City of Cedar Park between 1990 and 2010 (US Census, 1990-2010). As residential, retail and commercial growth continues in the communities of Cedar Park, Leander and Liberty Hill north of the corridor, it is anticipated that congestion will worsen, and mobility will be further reduced.

The corridor provides access to downtown Austin, as well as businesses, major employment centers, religious institutions, schools, parks and trails, recreational centers, and residential areas, all of which would benefit from a reduction in congestion and reliable travel times for transit and emergency responders.

Seton Northwest Hospital, Concentra Urgent Care and numerous health care facilities are located along the US 183 corridor. The existing traffic congestion and mobility issues can create delays for emergency response vehicles.

Because of traffic congestion, Capital Metro’s Express Bus route frequencies are significantly reduced during peak periods as compared to off-peak periods. 

What will happen if mobility improvements to 183 North are not implemented?

Given that population growth is expected to increase by 50% in Travis and Williamson counties by 2035 (Texas State Data Center, 2012), traffic congestion will continue to worsen, and mobility would continue to decline. If we do nothing to address traffic congestion, in 2035, it could take drivers, public transit buses and emergency responders three times longer to travel the corridor than it does today.

North of the study area, drivers and transit users can depend upon reliable travel times when using SH 45 North and 183A. South of the study area, drivers will soon be able to depend upon reliable travel times with completion of the MoPac Express Lanes. Without implementing improvements to US 183, mobility on this link between 183A and the MoPac Express Lanes would continue to decline, and drivers would lack reliable travel times.

Who conducted this study?

The Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority (Mobility Authority) and the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) developed the 183 North Mobility Project cooperatively with Travis County, Williamson County, the City of Austin, Capital Metro and the Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization, with oversight by other regulatory agencies.

What environmental issues were studied?

Potential impacts to the following were considered:

  • Aesthetic and visual resources
  • Air quality
  • Bicycle and pedestrian facilities
  • Cultural resources
  • Edwards Aquifer and other water resources
  • Floodplains
  • Geology and soils
  • Hazardous materials
  • Historic and archeological resources
  • Land use
  • Parkland
  • Social and community impacts (including community cohesion, environmental justice and limited English proficiency populations)
  • Surface water, including Shoal Creek, Shoal Creek Tributaries, Lake Creek, Lake Creek Tributaries and Rattan Creek
  • Threatened and endangered species, including karst invertebrates and the Jollyville Plateau salamander
  • Traffic noise
  • Vegetation
  • Wildlife
  • Indirect and Cumulative Impacts

Did 183 North Mobility Project consider how proposed improvements in this corridor, combined with proposed improvements along MoPac South, might impact the environment?

The Indirect and Cumulative Effects Analysis that was conducted as part of the 183 North Mobility Project analyzed the cumulative effects on the various environmental and human resources as a result of all of the past, present and future transportation projects within the project area.

The 183 North Mobility Project, the MoPac South Environmental Study and the MoPac Improvement Project are all included as stand-alone projects in the Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization's (CAMPO) 2040 Plan, and as such, are all studied separately by TxDOT and the Mobility Authority. Nonetheless, the study assumes all projects in the CAMPO 2035 plan have been implemented.

What was the timeframe of the study?

The study began in August 2013 and was complete in April 2016.

What alternatives were considered for the 183 North Mobility Project?

GENERAL PURPOSE LANES
  • Standard traffic lanes available for use by all types of vehicles
HIGH OCCUPANCY VEHICLE (HOV) LANES
  • Traffic lanes reserved during peak travel times or longer for vehicles with a driver and one or more passengers, including carpools, vanpools and public transit buses
EXPRESS LANES
  • Special separated lanes that are designed to keep traffic moving
  • Utilize variable toll pricing to manage the amount of traffic in the lane
  • Tolls increase when traffic is heavy and decrease when traffic is light
  • Toll-free for emergency responders, public transit buses, Capital Metro registered carpools and vanpools, MetroAccess vehicles and state and federal military vehicles
TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM MANAGEMENT (TSM)
  • Does not increase capacity
  • Low cost strategies enhance safety, manage congestion, and improve traffic flow. Examples include: Ramp metering; Traffic signal synchronization; Incident management; Bus pullouts; Intersection improvements
TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MANAGEMENT (TDM)
  • Strategies manage or decrease demand for auto-related travel and/or alternatives to single-occupant vehicles (transit, carpool, vanpools, bicycle)
  • Examples include incentives/disincentives such as: Congestion pricing; High Occupancy Vehicle lanes; Alternative work environments and Telecommuting
NO BUILD
  • Proposed improvements would not be constructed; assumes all other projects in the CAMPO Plan would be constructed  

How are mobility improvements developed and selected?

At the beginning of the study, the community were invited to help define a Purpose and Need for improvements. Concepts were then developed that met the Purpose and Need, and the community was invited to provide additional input on the development and evaluation of the proposed improvements. Public feedback was then combined with engineering feasibility, social, economic and environmental analyses of each alternative to identify the best options that considered all of these factors, ultimately leading to the identification of a recommended alternative. A “no build,” or “do nothing” alternative is carried through the process and used as a baseline for comparison.

After extensive review and study, the Mobility Authority and TxDOT hosted a public hearing where the public was able to formally comment on the draft Environmental Assessment and the recommended alternative. Following the public hearing, the Mobility Authority and TxDOT, with support from its partners, incorporated public input, responded to comments and made a final recommendation. 

In April 2016, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed 183 North Mobility Project. This allows the project to move forward into final design and construction, pending the identification of funding.

Why doesn't the study area extend all the way to I-35?

The 183 North Mobility Project study area reflects the project identified in the Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization’s (CAMPO) 2040 long-range transportation plan. This area is one of the most congested and heavily utilized sections of US 183.

If CAMPO includes improvements to US 183 between MoPac and I-35 in a long-range transportation plan, those improvements would be evaluated as part of a separate study.

If there is room to add two lanes in each direction, why can’t one of them be a general purpose lane?

Adding one general purpose lane and one Express Lane in each direction instead of adding two Express Lanes in each direction would reduce the capacity and operational efficiency of the proposed Express Lanes, without adding appreciable improvement in speed or reduction in delay on the general purpose lanes. Should future travel patterns suggest dropping one toll lane, that scenario could be studied for impacts.

With only one Express Lane in each direction, the slowest car in the Express Lane would dictate speeds for everyone in that lane. Having a second lane in each direction would also improve operations in the Express Lanes for emergency response vehicles.

If another general purpose lane was added to the corridor, it would fill up with traffic just like the existing US 183. Even adding two general purpose lanes in each direction would not address congestion issues on the corridor during the morning and evening peak periods in 2035. Adding one general purpose lane would have even less impact on average speeds.

Why can’t we build general purpose lanes instead of Express Lanes?

Even if funding was available to construct general purpose lanes, latent traffic demand would quickly fill these lanes, and they would become congested like the existing general purpose lanes on US 183 North. Simply adding capacity will not facilitate congestion management or reliability over the long term. Although added capacity may initially decrease congestion, drivers who would normally use other routes or modes of transportation migrate to fill the newly added capacity, quickly degrading the level of service within the corridor to, or close to, pre-construction levels. 

How is this study related to other projects in the region?

The 183 North Mobility Project was an independent study to look at mobility improvements along US 183 between SH 45 North and MoPac.

This study considered how mobility improvements along US 183 North could seamlessly connect with other major highways to enhance regional connectivity; however, it is a stand-alone project.

The 183 North Mobility Project is not an extension of 183A but would provide seamless connectivity to the 183A tolled facility.

The 183 North Mobility Project is not an extension of the MoPac Improvement Project, which is under construction (visit www.MoPacExpress.com for details). The project would provide access to the tolled lanes currently under construction on MoPac North.

The 183 North Mobility Project is not related to the MoPac South Environmental Study.

Would this project connect with 183A, MoPac and SH 45 North?

Yes. The Express Lanes include a direct connection to SH 45 in the north and a direct connection to MoPac in the south. 183A traffic would flow seamlessly onto the 183 North Express Lanes. Take a closer look using the project maps.

Will the proposed improvements include taking additional right-of-way?

The study will consider improvements within the existing right-of-way. We do not anticipate the need to take any additional right-of-way.

What is Context Sensitive Solutions?

At the beginning of the study, the team initiated a Context Sensitive Solutions (CSS) process so that any mobility improvements that may be implemented would fit into the surrounding physical setting while reflecting the unique features and characteristics of the project area. 

Will bicycle and pedestrian improvements be part of the 183 North Mobility Project?

The corridor is heavily populated with businesses, retail and neighborhoods, and the right-of-way available for bicycle and pedestrian improvements is highly constrained by existing utilities, walls, driveways, steep slopes and drainage features.

Despite these obstacles, the Mobility Authority will provide safe connectivity for bicyclists and pedestrian throughout the corridor, which would close existing gaps to provide a network of continuous bike lanes available to cyclists traveling between SH 45N and MoPac. These improvements would include:

  • An 8-foot wide Shared Use Path to connect the Jollyville Road bike lanes to the bike lanes on Pond Springs, a distance of approximately 1,600 feet.
  • An 8-foot wide Shared Use Path from bike lanes on Pond Springs to the bike lanes on Lake Creek Parkway adjacent to the US 183 northbound frontage road, a distance of approximately 2,600 feet.
  • Sidewalks along the US 183 northbound and southbound frontage roads from RM 620/SH 45N to Loop 360 in locations where sidewalks do not currently exist.
  • Cross street connections for bicyclists consisting of 5-foot bike lanes in each direction, created by re-striping the existing cross street pavement to narrow the traffic lanes to 11 feet each.

The Mobility Authority's total investment in bicycle and pedestrian accommodations in the region will top $47 million, including their projects that are open to traffic and under construction.

Will transit improvements be considered?

The Express Lanes would provide a reliable, toll-free route for emergency responders, public transit buses, Capital Metro registered carpools and vanpools, MetroAccess vehicles and state and federal military vehicles .

Why is the Express Lanes Alternative recommended?

The addition of two new tolled Express Lanes in each direction best meets the Purpose and Need of the project by:

  • Using variable toll pricing to manage traffic (keep it moving) in the Express Lanes, even if adjacent lanes are congested.
  • Providing non-tolled, free-flowing, reliable routes and dependable travel times for emergency responders, public transit buses and registered carpools and vanpools.
  • Facilitating reliable emergency response by allowing emergency vehicles to drive toll-free in the Express Lanes, so they can bypass congestion as quickly as possible.

As always, the No Build (Do Nothing) Alternative was carried forward for the entirety of the study.

What are Express Lanes?

Express Lanes are special lanes that are separated from the general purpose lanes and designed to remain congestion free. They utilize variable toll pricing to manage the amount of traffic in the lanes. This is accomplished by increasing the toll when traffic is heavy and lowering it when traffic is light. Variable toll pricing is intended to keep traffic in the Express Lanes moving, giving drivers who choose to use the Express Lanes a faster and more reliable trip. Public transit buses, emergency responders, Capital Metro registered carpools and vanpools, MetroAccess vehicles, and state and federal military vehicles may always use the Express Lanes without paying a toll. The same number of non-tolled general purpose lanes that exist today would remain, in accordance with state law.

Why was the High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes alternative eliminated from the study?

Although HOV lanes meet the Purpose and Need for the project, this alternative was not carried forward for further study because it would not maximize use of the available roadway capacity.

Research revealed that on roads where HOV access is limited to vehicles with three or more passengers, the lanes are under-utilized. Conversely, when HOV access is granted to any vehicle with two or more passengers, the lanes are over-utilized.

The Texas A&M Transportation Institute reported that as of spring 2013, Departments of Transportation across the country converted or planned to convert 24 HOV lanes to either Express Lanes or High Occupancy Toll lanes.

Furthermore, when HOV Lanes were evaluated against Express Lanes for the 183 North corridor, HOV lanes were projected to transport 59% (11,379) fewer people in 2035 than the Express Lane alternative during peak periods. (CDM Smith, 2015)

Reliability on HOV lanes cannot be assured without a variable toll pricing component to ensure a minimum average speed or without limiting vehicles to three or more passengers, which would result in an under-utilized facility. The CAMPO plan has identified tolling as the financing mechanism to fund improvements along US 183 North because no other funding source is available.

Why is this going to be a toll road?

The Express Lanes alternative would use variable toll pricing to provide reliable travel times during peak periods to ensure a reliable trip for all users. Public transit buses, emergency responders, Capital Metro registered carpools and vanpools, MetroAccess vehicles and state and federal military vehicles would drive toll free.

State and federal fuel taxes are the primary funding source for roads and bridges in Texas. However, this funding source has remained static since 1991 even though fuel costs have tripled. Because this is an incremental revenue source, decreases in consumer demand due to people driving less and/or driving more fuel efficient vehicles, will also affect revenue generation through the fuel tax. When you factor in the state’s significant population growth and demand on the roadway infrastructure, funding has not kept up with demand, and mobility is likely to continue to get worse. Because of this, innovative financing options are considered viable solutions to funding new projects.

Will drivers have a choice whether or not to use the Express Lanes?

The Express Lanes will be tolled; however, the same number of non-tolled travel lanes available today will remain so in the future, in accordance with state law. Drivers would have a choice whether or not to use the Express Lanes. Public transit buses, emergency responders, Capital Metro registered vanpools and carpools, MetroAccess vehicles, and state and federal military vehicles drive toll-free.

If Express Lanes are approved for construction, what other improvements could be made to the corridor?

Improvements include landscape treatments, retaining walls, hardscape, bridges, operational improvements (i.e. ramp, auxiliary lane, and intersection improvements), and enhancements to bicycle and pedestrian facilities where reasonable and feasible.

The Express Lanes Alternative includes extending the 4th general purpose lane southbound from south of Pecan Park Blvd. to MoPac and northbound from Braker Lane to McNeil Drive. This extension would provide a total of four non-tolled general purpose lanes in each direction continuously between MoPac and SH 45N. Approximately 8 lanes miles total will be extended (3 miles northbound and 5 miles southbound).

In addition, an acceleration/merge lane at the southbound entrance ramp from Oak Knoll Drive has been added to improve the merging operations at this on ramp.

Improvements for safe connectivity for bicyclists and pedestrians throughout the corridor would also be included, which would close existing gaps to provide a network of continuous bike lanes available to cyclists traveling between SH 45N and MoPac.

How would Express Lanes impact Express Bus service?

Because of traffic congestion, Capital Metro's Express Bus route frequencies are significantly reduced during peak periods as compared to off-peak periods. If Express Lanes are added to the corridor, they would provide a reliable route for transit. Express Lanes could make it possible for Capital Metro to run more frequent Express Bus service in the corridor, including during peak periods.

What will be done to improve the Loop 360 Interchange?

A separate study is being conducted by TxDOT’s Austin District to define safety and mobility problems on Loop 360, and plan for interim and long-term solutions. More information about that effort can be found here: http://www.txdot.gov/inside-txdot/projects/studies/austin/loop-360.html.

The 183 North Mobility Project team is exploring options to improve safety and operations at the Loop 360 interchange. Some of the possible improvements being studied include: optimized traffic signal timing, re-striping of the southbound frontage road approach to reduce weaving issues from the southbound exit ramp, constructing additional left and/or right turn lanes, constructing U-turn structures, and modifications to the left turn configurations on Loop 360. Potential improvements will depend on the feasibility, constructability, and efficiency of each option, which will be determined during the detailed design phase for the recommended alternative.

What will be done to improve the MoPac Interchange?

The addition of two, one-lane direct connectors at the MoPac interchange are proposed as part of the 183 North Mobility Project. One would link the 183 North Express Lanes to the southbound MoPac Express Lanes. Those improvements would tie in around RM 2222. The other would link the northbound MoPac Express Lanes to the 183 North Express Lanes.

While detailed design has not been completed yet, the Express Lane direct connector would be no more than 50 feet above the adjacent general purpose lanes in the median of US 183. Along MoPac, the Express Lane direct connector would be no higher than the existing direct connector linking the general purpose lanes from northbound MoPac to northbound US 183, with a maximum height of about 70 feet above the MoPac general purpose lanes.

What Transportation Demand Management (TDM) and Transportation Systems Management (TSM) strategies are being incorporated into the project?

TDM strategies involve managing or decreasing the demand for automobile travel, such as public transit, bicycling, and telecommuting. None of these strategies would increase the overall capacity of US 183. Although TDM does not meet the Purpose and Need, the Express Lanes Alternative would provide a free, reliable route for Capital Metro transit vehicles and registered vanpools, which encourages the use of transit in the corridor.

TSM is a collection of low-cost strategies to enhance safety, reduce congestion, and improve traffic flow, such as changeable message signs and clearing accidents and breakdowns quickly to allow traffic to move more smoothly. None of these strategies would increase the overall capacity of US 183. Although it does not meet the Purpose and Need, two TSM strategies currently being implemented in the US 183 corridor include the use of changeable message signs to provide information about the transportation system management tool to assist motorists, and the Highway Emergency Response Operator (HERO) Program, which patrols a 12-mile stretch of US 183, providing assistance to stranded motorists.

As part of the 183 North Mobility Project, proposed TSM strategies include:

  • Addition or modification of acceleration and deceleration lanes at ramps with merge conditions (Oak Knoll Drive southbound entrance, Oak Knoll Drive northbound exit)
  • Addition or modification of auxiliary lanes with optimized designs based on detailed operational analysis (inside auxiliary lanes for 183N Express Lane ingress/egress, auxiliary lanes for MoPac North ingress/egress)

Will sound walls be constructed as part of this project?

A noise analysis was conducted for the proposed project. The study showed that increased traffic generated from the project would cause noise impacts throughout the corridor; however, barriers (sound walls) would not be feasible and reasonable for those areas impacted by increased noise. Sound walls are not proposed for incorporation into the project. 

Texas voters just passed Proposition 1. Why can't those funds be used to pay for improvements to US 183 North?

In November 2014, Texas voters approved a constitutional amendment to provide billions more in reliable transportation funding, colloquially known as Proposition or Prop 1. The amendment authorizes annual disbursements from the state’s oil and gas production tax collections to the State Highway Fund.

For fiscal year 2015, Prop 1 will provide an estimated $1.7 billion for TxDOT’s use. Of that amount, the TxDOT Austin District, which is comprised of 11 counties including Bastrop, Blanco, Burnet, Caldwell, Gillespie, Hays, Lee, Llano, Mason, Travis and Williamson, expects to receive approximately $120 million in funds. The rest of the money is going elsewhere in the state.

These funds must be used and allocated throughout the state in accordance with existing formulas adopted by the Texas Transportation Commission. The funds can only be used for the construction, maintenance, rehabilitation, and acquiring right-of-way for public roads, but may not be used for toll roads. 

While helpful, what the Austin District is receiving through Prop 1 is nowhere near close enough to cover the cost of building the proposed 183 North Mobility Project. For more information about Prop 1, view: http://www.txdot.gov/inside-txdot/office/state-affairs/ballot-proposition.html.

What environmental standards would the 183 North Mobility Project adhere to?

The 183 North Mobility Project would adhere to the National Environmental Policy Act which requires, to the fullest extent possible, that the policies, regulations and laws of the Federal Government (e.g., Endangered Species Act, Clean Water Act, etc.) be interpreted and administered in accordance with its environmental protection goals.

Additionally, the 183 North Mobility Project would limit the proposed improvements to within the existing right-of-way, with the exception of drainage easements and existing retention ponds. This restriction means that impacts to waters of the U.S., threatened/endangered species habitats, residential/commercial developments, community cohesion, and historic/archeological resources would be reduced or avoided.

Drainage easements and existing retention ponds may need to be constructed outside the existing right-of-way in order to accomplish the removal of 80% of the Total Suspended Solids (TSS) for the project, as required by the Edwards Aquifer Rules administered by the TCEQ.

Temporary erosion and sedimentation controls would be in place throughout the construction process based on Edwards Aquifer Rules and Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan requirements of the TCEQ.

What percentage of Total Suspended Solids (TSS) removal does the 183 North Mobility Project anticipate?

Because the 183 North Mobility Project area is located over the Recharge Zone, the removal of a minimum of 80% of the increase in TSS for the entire corridor would be required, in compliance with the Edward's Aquifer Rules that are administered by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). These standards reduce effects to endangered species that are aquifer dependent, such as the Jollyville Plateau Salamander, as well as endangered karst-dependent species that may occur near the project area.

What water quality measures are being considered as part of the 183 North Mobility Project?

If the 183 North Mobility Project is approved for construction, the Mobility Authority and TxDOT would work with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality ((TCEQ) and others to develop a comprehensive water quality protection plan incorporating Best Management Practices because the project area is within TCEQ's regulated Recharge Zone. As part of the water quality protection plan development, measures would be developed to attain a minimum of 80% Total Suspended Solids (TSS) removal required by the regulations within consideration for protection of endangered or threatened species, including karst invertebrates and the Jollyville salamander. Increased TSS removal reduces effects to endangered species that depend on the aquifer for habitat. Karst features are present in many areas of the Recharge Zone, and TSS removal also reduces effects to endangered species that depend on the karst features for habitat. The threatened and endangered species protection issues would be coordinated with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services and others.

The following measures are being considered to treat the new impervious cover associated with the 183 North Mobility Project by slowing runoff so that Total Suspended Solids (TSS) and associated pollutants would settle out and be removed from stormwater volumes before entering local streams and waterways outside of the right-of-way:

  • Extended detention - similar to normal detention except that the retention time is increased to allow particulate pollutants to settle out of stormwater. This measure is currently in use at the SH45/US183 intersection for some areas.
  • Biofiltration - a variant of Sedimentation/Filtration where the sand filter is replaced by biofiltration media and associated plants.
  • Bioretention and Vegetated Bioretention - swales that use plant and soil media to filter and treat stormwater through physical, biological, and chemical treatment processes.
  • Sedimentation/Filtration - involves detaining stormwater to allow settling followed by sand filtration and is the primary control measure used currently throughout the project area.
  • Vegetative Measures –surface filtration through various types of plant species. The species would be coordinated with biological experts.
  • Underground sedimentation/filtration vaults – rectangular and mostly hollow structures that function in a similar way to ponds by storing water to allow for sedimentation and filtration of pollutants in storm water as defined above. Vaults are placed underground when land for ponds is not available. Currently in-use within the corridor and may be needed in areas where space is constrained. 

During construction, temporary erosion and sediment controls would be installed and maintained throughout the project. These controls would include rock berms, silt fence and a full array of measures to reduce the potential for sediment being discharged from the site.

What water quality Best Management Practices are being considered for the 183 North Mobility Project? 

The 183 North Mobility Project team is considering the following Best Management Practices to protect the Edwards Aquifer and other groundwater resources: 

  • Expanding and enhancing existing water quality ponds
  • Expanding existing water quality vaults
  • Enhancements to detention ponds
  • Biofiltration swales
  • Additional water quality ponds
  • Enhanced spill controls

How has public input been utilized by the 183 North Mobility Project team?

As a result of public input, the Express Lanes Alternative includes extending the 4th general purpose lane southbound from south of Pecan Park Blvd. to MoPac and northbound from Braker Lane to McNeil Drive. This extension would provide a total of four non-tolled general purpose lanes in each direction continuously between MoPac and SH 45N. Approximately 8 lanes miles total will be extended (3 miles northbound and 5 miles southbound).

In addition, an acceleration/merge lane at the southbound entrance ramp from Oak Knoll Drive has been added to improve the merging operations at this on ramp.

Public input also influenced the inclusion of resources to provide safe connectivity for bicyclists and pedestrian throughout the corridor, which would close existing gaps to provide a network of continuous bike lanes available to cyclists traveling between SH 45N and MoPac.

Why should the project have two Express Lanes in each direction, rather than one?

Many agencies avoid, if possible, providing only one lane in each direction, for several reasons.

Reliability: Constructing only one lane in each direction makes it more likely that drivers who use the project will experience disruptions in reliability. Minor incidents, even a flat tire, could easily disrupt the flow of traffic and speed in the Express Lane. Additionally, drivers who choose to travel at slow speeds in the Express Lane would impact the travel time reliability of all trailing vehicles.

Incident management: Constructing two lanes in each direction provides the additional capacity needed to enable a faster and easier response to incidents in the corridor.

Access: With two lanes in each direction, one is available to support entering and exiting traffic and one lane can support through traffic. A project with only one lane in each direction is much more likely to experience disruptions in the traffic flow.

How much will construction cost?

Based on the current design, the preliminary construction cost estimate is $650 million. 

Who can ride toll-free on roads or lanes operated by the Mobility Authority?

On toll roads or lanes operated by the Mobility Authority, including 183 North Express Lanes if they are constructed, the following can drive toll-free:

  • Emergency responders
  • Public transit buses
  • Capital metro registered carpools and vanpools
  • MetroAccess vehicles
  • State and federal military vehicles
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3300 N. IH-35 Suite 300
Austin, TX 78705

(512) 996-9778 Email Us
Contact Us

3300 N. IH-35 Suite 300
Austin, TX 78705

Call (512) 996-9778
Email Us